Portfolio

Portfolio

Think Brick Competition

Think Brick Competition

The competition called for a unique response to a tourist precinct constructed from brick. Showcasing bricks unique attributes as well as an iconic approach to a strong concept.

The concept was inspirational to both Jo Gillies and Teneil Van Dyck who worked on the designs in a very short time frame to complete the submission.

We both received intuitively that kinetic art connects people to places – more especially when they are inactivated old warehouse areas that have no merit in terms of landscape; gardens; ground views or cafes/shops at all. Once this came to us we explored the relationship between pop art and bricks to create kinetic art through the brick medium on a large scale. Kids can interact with their parents and then walk up the rampart to the viewing platform which can access the Botany bay views. The rampart leads to a ‘headland’ area that is inspired by the unique Sydney headlands of Sydney harbour. This was the second part our inspiration when we tuned into what Sydney is also famous for. The headland is constructed of brick and green walling and inside it is an exhibition space with shops and eateries. The amphitheatre is located and has elements of the rampart wrapping around it to create a natural semi-circle. The front area of this draws people in as they come from the airport or visit enroute to the airport.

Long Reef SLSC

Long Reef SLSC

Archisoul Architects were approached to design a community concept for a new and refurbished surf life saving club at Long Reef.

All community parties were exhaustively consulted to meet all consensual requirements. The concept was to honor the existing building footprint for its proximity to the ocean and its subdued and nestled appearance. Subtle integration into the landscape allows the design to be contextually appropriate yet still meeting the practical requirements of a working surf club.

Green Turtle

Green Turtle

Green Turtle terraces are located in 1770 Queensland. The design is a unique approach to cluster town housing to incorporate maximum solar penetration and cross ventilation through the breezes. The central courtyard area is a place to swim, BBQ and a communal meeting area. There is maximum privacy between units through the use of roofing privacy screens and blade walls, however there is always a feeling of community spirit between neighbors. The design concept came from the green turtles off the Great Barrier Reef where the turtle shell allows for aerodynamic ventilation and a sense of grace.

Quoll Centre

Quoll Centre

The Quoll Centre is designed as an integrative research facility and rehabilitation centre for the Eastern Quoll of New South Wales. Australian Quoll species have rapidly declined in number owing to habitat loss due to urbanisation, threatening the survival of this wonderful species. The site for this scheme is located in the John Moroney Correctional Facility, where the prisoners can help to monitor, rehabilitate and care for the Quolls, and in return receive rehabilitation for themselves. The design was derived from a serpentine curve through the bush landscape, allowing opening up of the cages to their natural environments. Natural materials were selected, enabling a more subtle research facility to be designed which sits well within the context of the site.

Sandy Flats

Sandy Flats

Sandy Flats involves the gutting of an existing dwelling on the beach, subdividing it into three apartments; the lower apartment incorporates disabled accessibility. The design of the facade involves undulation of the private box type timber definitions, which is derived from the concept of the rippling sand effect at Collaroy beach. This is aimed at senior living and each person can share the communal area of the garden/beach in front whilst still maintaining individual privacy.